Two image collects released by Tactical Satellite-3 demonstration program

Image of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, taken by the TacSat-3's primary payload, the Advanced Responsive Tactically-Effective Military Imaging Spectrometer. (U.S. Air Force image)

Image of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, taken by the TacSat-3's primary payload, the Advanced Responsive Tactically-Effective Military Imaging Spectrometer. (U.S. Air Force image)

The National Mall in Washington, D.C., is featured in this image collect obtained by the TacSat-3 experimental demonstration during its 13-month mission. (U.S. Air Force image)

The National Mall in Washington, D.C., is featured in this image collect obtained by the TacSat-3 experimental demonstration during its 13-month mission. (U.S. Air Force image)

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, N.M. -- Two image collects obtained by the Tactical Satellite-3's primary payload, the Advanced Responsive Tactically-Effective Military Imaging Spectrometer, during the experimental demonstration's 13-month mission were released today by program officials here and at Hanscom AFB, Mass.

One features the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, and the other shows the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

"The TacSat-3's ARTEMIS sensor accomplished over 2,200 data collects during its initial employment in space and validated its potential use in support of the warfighter. Both released images are modified three-spectral band renderings from the 400 plus available bands in the imaging spectrometer data cubes," said Dr. Thomas Cooley, TacSat-3 program manager. "Regarding the images, the project had a Proper Use Memorandum, which gave us the legal authority to collect data from both locations to support technical validation of the sensor."

Developed by Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, the ARTEMIS consists of a trio of components: a telescope, a spectrometer and an onboard digital signal processor. In addition, ATK Spacecraft Systems and Services' TacSat-3 modular bus accomplished the sensor pointing and thermal control required to obtain the hyperspectral images.

Five days ago, control of the spacecraft transferred from the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate to Air Force Space Command, Peterson AFB, Colo.