Heritage activities offer chance to volunteer

The Air Force Flight Test Center Museum features a variety of exhibits including aircraft, election seats, weapons, models and engines. (Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jason Hernandez)

The Air Force Flight Test Center Museum features a variety of exhibits including aircraft, ejection seats, weapons, models and engines. (Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jason Hernandez)

The F-15 static display aircraft at Arnold Air Force Base's Main Gate was dedicated in honor of Maj. Jim Duricy who was killed when he was forced to eject at high speed as the F-15 he piloted crashed into the Gulf of Mexico April 30, 2002. He was assigned to the 40th Flight Test Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (Air Force photo by David Housch)

The F-15 static display aircraft at Arnold Air Force Base's Main Gate was dedicated in honor of Maj. Jim Duricy who was killed when he was forced to eject at high speed as the F-15 he piloted crashed into the Gulf of Mexico April 30, 2002. He was assigned to the 40th Flight Test Squadron, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (Air Force photo by David Housch)

Arnold House, the oldest structure at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, was originally built by bridge engineer Henry Hebble in 1842.  It was home to a number of notable residents, including Maj. Henry A. "Hap" Arnold.  Arnold would later become the leader of the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II and the Air Force's only five-star general. The home is now a heritage center used for special events. (Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

Arnold House, the oldest structure at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, was originally built by bridge engineer Henry Hebble in 1842. It was home to a number of notable residents, including Maj. Henry A. "Hap" Arnold. Arnold would later become the leader of the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II and the Air Force's only five-star general. The home is now a heritage center used for special events. (Air Force photo by Ben Strasser)

Hangar 9 stands as the only World War I era aircraft hangar listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Hangar 9 was built as a "temporary" structure in 1918 when Brooks Field was established as a training base for the Air Service of the Army Signal Corps. (Courtesy Photo)

Hangar 9 stands as the only World War I era aircraft hangar listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Hangar 9 was built as a "temporary" structure in 1918 when Brooks Field was established as a training base for the Air Service of the Army Signal Corps. (Courtesy Photo)

Today the original Hill Field Chapel stands majestically on the Hill Aerospace Museum grounds, retired from "active duty" as a religious facility, but still serving proudly. Private individuals and organizations sometimes rent the Chapel for weddings. (Courtesy Photo)

Today the original Hill Field Chapel stands majestically on the Hill Aerospace Museum grounds, retired from "active duty" as a religious facility, but still serving proudly. Private individuals and organizations sometimes rent the Chapel for weddings. (Courtesy Photo)

Volunteers from the 33rd Maintenance Group fix broke “jets” at the Air Armament Museum in preparation for Shalimar Elementary School’s annual “Engineers for America” program Feb. 18. The jets were used for an activity that explained the flight of the Doolittle Raiders designed to teach fifth-grade students basic aerodynamics. (Air Force photo by Chrissy Cuttita)

Volunteers from the 33rd Maintenance Group fix broke “jets” at the Air Armament Museum in preparation for Shalimar Elementary School’s annual “Engineers for America” program Feb. 18. The jets were used for an activity that explained the flight of the Doolittle Raiders designed to teach fifth-grade students basic aerodynamics. (Air Force photo by Chrissy Cuttita)

Airmen of the 653rd Combat Logistics Support Squadron provide corrosion control for the Robins’ Museum of Aviation's F-100. (Air Force photo by Sue Sapp)

Airmen of the 653rd Combat Logistics Support Squadron provide corrosion control for the Robins’ Museum of Aviation's F-100. (Air Force photo by Sue Sapp)

As a field museum of the United States Air Force Museum System, Hill Aerospace Museum’s mission is to portray the history of Hill Air Force Base, its tenant organizations, and the assignments of the Ogden Air Logistics Center. (Courtesy Photo)

As a field museum of the United States Air Force Museum System, Hill Aerospace Museum’s mission is to portray the history of Hill Air Force Base, its tenant organizations, and the assignments of the Ogden Air Logistics Center. (Courtesy Photo)

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB, Ohio -- Have some spare time on your hands? Want to give back to the Air Force community? The heritage activities in Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) are looking for volunteers to help support museum operations.

In addition to the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, AFMC has 14 heritage activities spread over 11 bases. Activities include field museums, heritage centers, airparks, and historical holdings- each of which offers the opportunity for volunteers.

Volunteers do everything from greeting and guiding visitors to restoring aircraft. All four of the field museums, located at Edwards AFB, Eglin AFB, Hill AFB, and Robins AFB, operate dynamic and educational programs that serve the local public and private school systems. Volunteers help with student groups, teaching the fundamentals of flight, and talking to them about the aerospace career field. Other volunteer opportunities include helping with collections management, working in the reference library, or washing and painting aircraft. Below are brief descriptions of the four field museums accepting volunteers:

· Edwards AFB, CA home to the mission of flight test since the 1950's, hosts the AF Flight Test Museum. The names of famous pilots and planes resonate throughout the museum, such as the X-1 flown by Chuck Yeager and the XB-49 flown by Glenn Edwards, namesake of the base.

· Eglin AFB, FL is home of the Air Armament Museum. The museum displays the history of the development of bombs and missiles. One of its newest additions is the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb (MOAB), nicknamed the "Mother Of All Bombs" and weighing in at 21,000 lbs.

· The mission of Hill AFB, UT's Aerospace Museum is to portray the history of Hill AFB, Utah, through a collection of aviation artifacts. The museum hosts nearly 90 static display aircraft and offers a variety of opportunities for volunteers to handle their "care and feeding."

· The Museum of Aviation at Robins AFB, GA is the second largest Air Force museum (after the National Museum of the USAF.) The museum's newest exhibit, which recently won a 2009 Air Force Heritage Award, is titled "Down to Earth: the 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment and the Air Invasion of Normandy."

Additional AFMC field heritage activities are located at Hanscom AFB, MA; Holloman AFB, NM; Kirtland AFB, NM; and Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. To find out more about these and other heritage activities AFMC has to offer, visit the bases' public websites, or contact Ms. Laura Romesburg at 937-257-3279 or DSN 787-3279.