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  • AFMC, ACC expand weapons system collaboration

    Gen. Arnold W. Bunch, Jr., commander, Air Force Materiel Command and Gen. Mike Holmes, commander, Air Combat Command, signed a memorandum of agreement establishing the Lead Wing Collaboration Program during the Technology and Acquisition Sustainment Review Conference, Jan. 29 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.
  • Air Force sets foundation for energy optimization, lethality

    As 2020 approaches and the Air Force prepares to take on the challenges of the next decade, we must also review our successes and lessons learned from the last year. For Air Force Operational Energy, 2019 was a year for laying the foundation to build a more optimized and lethal force in the years to come.
  • F-16 downs drone during cruise missile defense testing

    The 85th Test and Evaluation Squadron shot down a subscale drone using an AGR-20A Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System laser-guided rocket Dec. 19, providing a proof of concept for using rockets queued from an F-16 Fighting Falcon targeting pod as viable munitions to perform cruise missile defense.
  • Massive funding influx expedites Tyndall rebuild

    The final months of FY19 were rewarding for Tyndall Air Force Base as they received the June 2019 Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act to increase their annual operations and maintenance budget by a massive 450 percent. Under the act, O&M funding assigned $56 million to sustain regular base operations with an additional $358.4 million allotted for Hurricane Michael recovery under the facility sustainment restoration modernization designation.
  • Florida resilience chief gets look at Tyndall rebuild

    Florida’s first Chief Resilience Officer Dr. Julia Nesheiwat visited Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, to see first-hand the Tyndall Program Management Office’s plans to develop and rebuild a resilient “Installation of the Future.” The main responsibility of the CRO is to prepare Florida for the environmental, physical and economic impacts of sea level rise and develop resilience goals that will help protect coastal communities. The Tyndall leadership team briefed Nesheiwat on the current state of the installation and the commitment to incorporate resiliency, innovation and technology as main components of the rebuild plans.
  • PMO, USACE partner to rebuild Tyndall

    After Hurricane Michael hit Tyndall Air Force Base in October 2018, the Air Force and Army forged a partnership with a single vision in mind--to build the “Installation of the future.” The Tyndall Project Management Office is rebuilding the base and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers became an important ally as the rebuild moved forward. With crucial partners like the USACE working alongside the PMO, Tyndall is on track to become a 21st century leader for the Air Force.
  • CEMIRT increases productivity despite hurricane direct hit

    The damage unleashed when Hurricane Michael struck Tyndall AFB in October 2018 hasn’t deterred the Civil Engineer Maintenance Inspection and Repair Team from delivering the installation support the Air Force expects. In fact, despite damaged homes, displaced families and disrupted lives, the CEMIRT team is exceeding expectations. The team supports installations across the Air Force with a suite of civil engineering-associated maintenance and repair capabilities, including electrical systems and mechanical systems; power production; aircraft arresting systems, heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems.
  • Tyndall holds third industry day to plan rebuild of base

    Resilient. Sustainable. Adaptable. This was the mantra of Air Force planners, community leaders and industry representatives collaborating on the rebuild of Tyndall Air Force Base during an industry day held near the base Sept. 12. Nearly a year after Hurricane Michael caused massive destruction to Tyndall and Bay County on Oct. 10, 2018, the Air Force and local community are rebuilding and looking to the future.
  • Travis AFB produces first certified 3-D printed aircraft parts

    The Stratasys F900 3D printer, which is capable of printing plastic parts up to 36-by-24-by-36 inches, uses a material called Ultem 9085 that is more flexible, dense and stronger than typical plastic.
  • Record-setting first sortie for wing's newest F-35A

    Aircraft tail number 5261 left Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth, Texas, production facility a little after 8 a.m. Aug. 1, landed at Hill Air Force Base at 10 a.m., and by 3 p.m. had taken off on its first combat training mission.
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