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Command News

  • Disabled vets get back in the hunt at Wright-Patt

            WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio - Our veterans often return home with combat-related disabilities that may or may not be visible.Some are confined to wheelchairs while others

  • Stay connected with Air Force Marathon app

    The Air Force Marathon app is another way race organizers are enhancing the experience for all participants, including runners, spectators and volunteers, with an informative and interactive way to take part in Air Force Marathon weekend.

  • Marathon registration fees to increase after Independence Day

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – With only two months before the Air Force Marathon kicks off, participants can save on their race entry fees if registered by July 5, prior to the scheduled fourth price increase.Registration for the full and half marathons will increase by $10, while the 10K

  • World War II paratroop reenactors land at museum

    The C-47 Skytrains Tico Belle (top) and Placid Lassie approach their drop zone near the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on April 27, 2022, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The two planes were among those used to drop troops on Normandy for D-Day during World War II. (U.S. Air Force

  • Start prepping now to cross finish line

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio – Sweat, tears, medals and a feeling of accomplishment is what awaits those who cross the finish line at the 2022 Air Force Marathon. Before that, the body should be trained to perform.The Air Force Marathon team provides training programs for the full and half

  • Compass recycling gives old products new life

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- Anyone who’s navigated over land in the military has probably used a lensatic compass.Lensatic compasses contain a glow-in-the-dark chemical called tritium, a self-powered lighting source that requires no recharging. The tritium illuminates the compass face