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  • Guidance, support play role in mentoring dynamics

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- I have had several mentors during various stages of my career, and because of my own experiences I know it is important to have a mentor and to be a mentor.  The purpose of a mentor is not to tell someone what to do or how to do it, but to provide a supportive environment for the mentee to accomplish his or
  • Mentoring: A mentality, not a meeting

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- We tend to think of the formal mentoring session as that special, dedicated time where all the secrets to professional success and development are unlocked. We come to the mentoring meeting well-prepared with questions in hand and pen and paper at the ready for fear of missing an important make-or-break
  • Mentoring: Making a difference

    When I was a student at National War College, I had the privilege to lead a group of 30 senior leaders to mentor youth weekly at an elementary school in downtown Washington, D.C. It was a great experience as we tackled math, science, and reading. However, what was more significant was the mentoring taking place at a much deeper level than simply academics.
  • The mentors around us

    It is truly an honor to serve the Airmen of Air Force Materiel Command as your command chief. Every day I witness incredible things that our Airmen are doing for our command, our Air Force, and our nation. As I travel and engage with our Airmen, mentorship is a topic that often comes up. It’s a subject that I am extremely passionate about, and I appreciate every opportunity I have to discuss it.
  • Combat planning and mentoring? Really!

    Outside, the temperature was hovering around 100 degrees and the concrete scintillated under the noon sun. Inside the state-of-the-art hardened aircraft shelters, maintainers steadfastly ensured the aircraft was clear of all discrepancies from the previous day’s combat. Across the flight line, bombs were meticulously built-up in preparation for loading. These weapons would soon wreak havoc on Iraqi airfields, tanks, and artillery. However, inside one of these brand new hangars, there were no aircraft nor maintainers; instead, rows of makeshift tables were surrounded by maps and flight planning computers.
  • The guiding principles of mentorship

    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio -- As a senior leader, I am routinely asked to “mentor” acquisition professionals, and I am always honored to provide advice and “pay it forward.” Below are some guiding principles I use when mentoring others. These guidelines are for folks who are mentoring someone for the first time, as well as the mentees in
  • Viewpoints: Mentors can help shape career outlook, resiliency

    My mom was the first woman to go to college in the family, and I’m fortunate enough to be the first generation able to set a course for my career, rather than having the course set by the circumstances. It can be a little challenging, not having family members to ask for career-specific guidance. After all, I think most of us want to avoid taking the long way around if a more direct route is available. That can be hard to do if you don’t know someone who has already been there and who understands how the system operates.
  • Viewpoints: All because of my mentors

    The words, ‘U.S. Air Force’ are sewn into my jacket that I wear every day, because of my mentors. Each stage of life requires role models to help you along the way, and it is no different in the professional world. In 8th grade, I went to Colorado on a family vacation, and my parents took me to see the United States Air Force Academy. We went there because it was a tourist spot, but little did we know that it would change my life forever.
  • Viewpoints: New environment brings chances for career collaboration, mentoring

    When I started my career as a Palace Acquire intern in the Human Resources field, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. My first day -- more realistically my first couple of months -- was a culture shock. I knew nothing about the federal civilian world or military protocols and procedures. My new colleagues and section chief helped tremendously with getting me acclimated to my new environment.
  • Viewpoints: Mentors provide guidance, expectations amid new Air Force experiences

    I started with the Air Force as a Palace Acquire intern roughly 18 months ago. Adjusting to the Air Force culture has been exciting, but challenging. There is so much to learn and remember, such as the many protocols, the vast number of acronyms, and even just navigating the two areas that make up Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. While this adjustment has taken time and effort, my mentors have made it easier, and have had a huge impact on my career.
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